Loudness

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[[Category: Sound]]
 
[[Category: Sound]]
The Loudness script has been incorporated into a more robust solution:
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Author: ''Jessy''
  
[[Audio]]
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==Description==
  
There is also a simple derivative available, to control the volume of the Audio Listener:
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Unity's [http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/ScriptReference/AudioSource-volume.html AudioSource.volume] and [http://unity3d.com/support/documentation/ScriptReference/AudioListener-volume.html AudioListener.volume] use what is known as a [http://www.angelfire.com/electronic/funwithtubes/Amp-Volume.html linear taper].  Although that is ideal for performance, it means that the 0-1 values that those properties utilize do not match up well with human perception, with loud values taking up a disproportionate amount of the range.  This script is designed to make working with loudness more intuitive.
  
[[Listener]]
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Loudness is a complex phenomenon, and this simple script does not, for instance, take [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal-loudness_contours equal-loudness contours] into account, but it should yield better results than a linear taper in every real-world case.  I've found the result described [http://www.animations.physics.unsw.edu.au/jw/dB.htm here, that "a 10 dB increase in sound level corresponds approximately to a perceived doubling of loudness"], leads the way to a highly usable loudness control.

Revision as of 20:22, 11 May 2011

Author: Jessy

Description

Unity's AudioSource.volume and AudioListener.volume use what is known as a linear taper. Although that is ideal for performance, it means that the 0-1 values that those properties utilize do not match up well with human perception, with loud values taking up a disproportionate amount of the range. This script is designed to make working with loudness more intuitive.

Loudness is a complex phenomenon, and this simple script does not, for instance, take equal-loudness contours into account, but it should yield better results than a linear taper in every real-world case. I've found the result described here, that "a 10 dB increase in sound level corresponds approximately to a perceived doubling of loudness", leads the way to a highly usable loudness control.

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